Health

Health - Mushrooms and Your Health

Antioxidants

The antioxidant content in mushrooms may help prevent lung, prostate, breast, and other types of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Mushrooms also contain a small amount of vitamin D. vitamin D supplementation may help prevent or treat some kinds of cancer, the effect may vary from person to person.

Diabetes

Dietary fibre may help manage a number of health conditions, including type 2 diabetes.  Many studies concluded that people who eat a lot of fibre may have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Fibre may help reduce blood glucose levels.

A cup of sliced, raw mushrooms, weighing 70 grams (g), provides almost 1 g of fibre.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults consume22.4-33.6 g   of dietary fibre each day, depending on sex and age.

Mushrooms, beans, some vegetables, brown rice, and whole-grain foods can all contribute to a person’s daily requirement of fibre.

Heart health                                 

The fibre, potassium, and vitamin C in mushrooms may contribute to cardiovascular health.

Potassium can help regulate blood pressure, and this may decrease the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommend reducing the intake of added salt in the diet and eating more foods that contain potassium.

 

Other benefits

Mushrooms are rich in B vitamins, such as:

  • riboflavin, or B-2
  • folate, or B-9
  • thiamine, or B-1
  • pantothenic acid, or B-5
  • niacin, or B-3

B vitamins help the body get energy from food and form red blood cells. A number of B vitamins also appear to be important for a healthy brain.

The choline in mushrooms can help with muscle movement, learning, and memory. Choline assists in maintaining the structure of cellular membranes and plays a role in the transmission of nerve impulses.

Mushrooms are also the only vegan, non-fortified dietary source of vitamin D.

Several other minerals that may be difficult to obtain from a vegan diet — such as selenium, potassium, copper,  iron, and phosphorus — are available in mushrooms.

Nutritional content

Many types of mushroom are edible, and most provide about the same quantities of the same nutrients per serving, regardless of their shape or size.

The table below shows how much of each nutrient a 96-g cup of whole, raw mushrooms provides. It also shows how much of each nutrient adults should consume every day, depending on their sex and age.

Nutrient Amount of nutrients in 1 cup of mushrooms Recommended daily intake
Energy (calories) 21.1 1,600–3,200
Protein (g) 3.0 46–56
Carbohydrate (g) 3.1, including 1.9 g of sugar 130
Calcium (mg) 2.9 1,000–1,300
Iron (mg) 0.5 8–18
Magnesium (mg) 8.6 310–420
Phosphorus (mg) 82.6 700–1,250
Potassium (mg) 305 4,700
Sodium (mg) 4.8 2,300
Zinc (mg) 0.5 8–11
Copper (mcg) 305 890–900
Selenium (mcg) 8.9 55
Vitamin C (mg) 2.0 65–90
Vitamin D (mg) 0.2 15
Folate (mcg DFE) 16.3 400
Choline (mg) 16.6 400–550
Niacin (mg) 3.5 14–16

Mushrooms also contain a number of B vitamins, including thiamine, riboflavin, B-6, and B-12.

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